Typography

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  • The Inspiring Everyday

    H&Co | News, Notes & Observations
    hoefler@typography.com
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:59 am
    Whether they’re typeface designers, graphic designers, web developers, or part of our business group, nobody at H&Co is immune to the charms of found typography, and we’re all compulsive sharers. Recently, our chief operating officer paid a visit to the garage to have her car serviced, and returned with a souvenir that made us smile: a paper tag left dangling from the rear view mirror, designer unknown, indifferently printed with a giant number in four inch block type. It prompted a conversation about the pleasures of anonymous typography, and how even the humblest bits of…
  • This Month in Typography

    I Love Typography
    Alec Julien
    4 Feb 2015 | 5:19 am
    Welcome to this month’s roundup of type-related info and entertainment. Today, we make Helvetica cookies, tumble for ligatures, uncover a longstanding typesetting mistake by the New York Times, ponder typefaces for cities, get reacquainted with ASCII art, prognosticate about responsive fonts of the future, get to know font designer Carlos Fabián Camargo Guerrero, talk about […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. This Month in Typography
  • Murder in Italic

    I Love Typography
    johno
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:58 am
    Most will be familiar with the name Francesco Griffo, born in Bologna in 1450, and forever associated with the Venetian printer-publisher Aldus Manutius for whom he designed and cut roman, Greek, and the first italic fonts. Their partnership was an especially fruitful one and their collaboration at the end of the fifteenth and beginning of […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Murder in Italic
  • Climbing Everest

    I Love Typography
    johno
    22 Feb 2015 | 1:53 am
    “Designing Zapfino Arabic takes everything I ever learned about type design and then some… Have never, ever, worked on anything this challenging.” — Facebook status: Oct. 24, 2013 Designing an Arabic companion to the Zapfino typeface was a running joke with my Monotype colleagues, one that I would react to half in amusement and half […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Climbing Everest
  • Sites We Like: Five Simple Steps & Readdd

    The Typekit Blog
    Sally Kerrigan
    27 Feb 2015 | 11:40 am
    This week, we’re catching up on a bit of web design reading, both online and off. Five Simple Steps We love the Five Simple Steps collection of tidy books on web design, and their website does a lovely job of presenting the whole collection. Brandon Grotesque is most prominent, used in the top menu nav and in headers throughout. FF Tisa is a great complement to this and appears in the body text. Readdd Readdd highlights worthy articles for designers each day, and we love seeing the headlines here in gorgeous Freight Display. The stylish typeface brings a sophisticated edge to the…
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    I Love Typography

  • Climbing Everest

    johno
    22 Feb 2015 | 1:53 am
    “Designing Zapfino Arabic takes everything I ever learned about type design and then some… Have never, ever, worked on anything this challenging.” — Facebook status: Oct. 24, 2013 Designing an Arabic companion to the Zapfino typeface was a running joke with my Monotype colleagues, one that I would react to half in amusement and half […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Climbing Everest
  • Notes on the first Books Printed in Italy

    johno
    13 Feb 2015 | 9:29 am
    In my recent article on The First Book Printed in Italy, I introduce the first books printed by Sweynheym and Pannartz in the Subiaco monastery complex in the Sabine hills to the west of Rome from 1465. On Twitter, in a great deal more than 140 characters, I received this enthusiastic barrage of Tweets: I […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Notes on the first Books Printed in Italy
  • This Month in Typography

    Alec Julien
    4 Feb 2015 | 5:19 am
    Welcome to this month’s roundup of type-related info and entertainment. Today, we make Helvetica cookies, tumble for ligatures, uncover a longstanding typesetting mistake by the New York Times, ponder typefaces for cities, get reacquainted with ASCII art, prognosticate about responsive fonts of the future, get to know font designer Carlos Fabián Camargo Guerrero, talk about […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. This Month in Typography
  • Murder in Italic

    johno
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:58 am
    Most will be familiar with the name Francesco Griffo, born in Bologna in 1450, and forever associated with the Venetian printer-publisher Aldus Manutius for whom he designed and cut roman, Greek, and the first italic fonts. Their partnership was an especially fruitful one and their collaboration at the end of the fifteenth and beginning of […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Murder in Italic
  • Making Fonts: GT Sectra

    johno
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    GT Sectra is a serif typeface combining the calligraphic influence of the broad nib pen with the sharpness of the scalpel. This sharpness defines its contemporary look. The GT Sectra subfamily was originally designed for the long-form magazine Reportagen, a publication with interesting stories from all around the world. The Zürich-based studio Moiré designed the […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Making Fonts: GT Sectra
 
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    H&Co | News, Notes & Observations

  • The Inspiring Everyday

    hoefler@typography.com
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:59 am
    Whether they’re typeface designers, graphic designers, web developers, or part of our business group, nobody at H&Co is immune to the charms of found typography, and we’re all compulsive sharers. Recently, our chief operating officer paid a visit to the garage to have her car serviced, and returned with a souvenir that made us smile: a paper tag left dangling from the rear view mirror, designer unknown, indifferently printed with a giant number in four inch block type. It prompted a conversation about the pleasures of anonymous typography, and how even the humblest bits of…
  • Introducing Obsidian

    hoefler@typography.com
    22 Jan 2015 | 4:47 am
    I’ve always wanted to create a decorative display face in the Regency style, one of those stout, industrial alphabets enlivened by bright, detailed illumination. Toward the end of our Surveyor project, a deep exploration of engraved map lettering, this idea started to feel especially relevant: engraved maps were often badged with elaborate title pieces, and the more time we spent with these hatched and shadowed letters, the more we could imagine how some of their visual qualities could be successfully interpreted in a contemporary typeface — and one that would be useful and…
  • Webfonts with Stylistic Sets

    hoefler@typography.com
    9 Dec 2014 | 5:00 am
    Now there’s a way to transform your web typography at the touch of a button: introducing Stylistic Sets for webfonts at Cloud.typography. In search of the perfect form for each of a font’s thousands of characters, typeface designers sometimes encounter questions that have more than one answer. Perhaps a flowery capital Q captures a font’s elegance, but one with a shorter tail is more practical when there’s no room for flourish. Perhaps a smart and serious typeface suddenly becomes cool and playful, with a subtle alteration to its lowercase a. H&Co loves making…
  • Introducing Quarto

    hoefler@typography.com
    10 Nov 2014 | 1:30 am
    Meet Quarto, a new family of display faces. Dutch Old Styles are marvelous and versatile typefaces, and one of typography’s dominant species. The style, which dates to the late sixteenth century, features a large lowercase, compact descenders, and a dense texture, together making them an excellent choice for setting headlines. We had the opportunity to explore the style when we were commissioned to create an original typeface for Portfolio magazine, a business title launched by Condé Nast, and designed by Robert Priest and Grace Lee. From out of this work comes Quarto®, a new…
  • Toward a Philosophy of Webfonts: A Lecture at Beyond Tellerrand, Berlin

    hoefler@typography.com
    29 Oct 2014 | 10:48 am
    If you’ll be in Berlin next week, I hope you’ll join me and my fellow speakers for Beyond Tellerrand, the design technology conference that’s quickly become a favorite locus for interesting design thinking. Equal measures of visual design and web technology always combine for an inspiring and provocative couple of days. I’ll be talking about webfonts, and a critical framework that I’ve found useful in understanding their intentions and assessing their quality. And if all goes well this week, I’m hoping to have the opportunity to introduce some new…
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    The Typekit Blog

  • Sites We Like: Five Simple Steps & Readdd

    Sally Kerrigan
    27 Feb 2015 | 11:40 am
    This week, we’re catching up on a bit of web design reading, both online and off. Five Simple Steps We love the Five Simple Steps collection of tidy books on web design, and their website does a lovely job of presenting the whole collection. Brandon Grotesque is most prominent, used in the top menu nav and in headers throughout. FF Tisa is a great complement to this and appears in the body text. Readdd Readdd highlights worthy articles for designers each day, and we love seeing the headlines here in gorgeous Freight Display. The stylish typeface brings a sophisticated edge to the…
  • A brief interview with Stephen Coles

    Libby Nicholaou
    23 Feb 2015 | 1:02 pm
    We’re looking forward to our first Working Late event in SF this Wednesday with Stephen Coles. If you haven’t already grabbed tickets, there’s still room; claim yours from the Eventbrite page. Stephen will be presenting “A Typeface is a Chair,” which interweaves typography with Mid-century Modernist furniture design. To gear up for the talk, we asked Stephen a few questions about typography, his influences, and some of his favorite typographic inspirations around SF and online. Illustration by Laura Serra What excites you most about typography? Just when I think…
  • Sites We Like: Typekit Gallery, Burning of Columbia & Queensland Ballet

    Sally Kerrigan
    19 Feb 2015 | 11:59 am
    Before we get into our regular Sites We Like programming, we wanted to mention a neat new corner of our own website: Our revamped Gallery page, where you can now see all the websites we’ve profiled here in one place. Thanks to our designer Jake for pulling this page together! Elsewhere on the web, we’ve spotted a couple new contenders to add to the Gallery in the near future. Burning of Columbia On the occasion of its 150th anniversary this year, this website is dedicated to the burning of Columbia, South Carolina, during the Civil War, detailing the history of the event and…
  • Finding the right Typekit plan

    David Demaree
    17 Feb 2015 | 2:01 pm
    If you’re new to Typekit, we realize it can be a little daunting to decide where to begin. To make it easier, today we’re rolling out a redesigned plans page to help you find and choose the right plan for your type needs. Get started for free with an Adobe ID You’ll get a Typekit Free plan just by signing up for an Adobe ID. This plan is yours to keep for as long as you want, and gives you access to a limited selection of fonts that you can sync to your desktop, or publish to one website. The Typekit Free plan is great for casual users, or people just getting started with Typekit. It…
  • Web fonts from WebINK are coming to Typekit

    Ivan Bettger
    13 Feb 2015 | 6:00 am
    Extensis has long been one of the few developers of typographic tools, centering primarily on font management with their popular Suitcase Fusion and Universal Type Server products. They also founded WebINK, a web font service that offers a great selection of fonts. WebINK is unfortunately shutting its doors later this year. Our friends at Extensis have been pointing their users, and foundries, over to Typekit for continuing web font services. We’ve built upon our own library and added a ton of fonts that will not only accommodate folks switching over from WebINK to Typekit, but also…
 
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    Typographica

  • A Haiku Homage to 2014

    Dyana Weissman
    16 Feb 2015 | 11:53 pm
    As we plunge into the final editing phase of Our Favorite Typefaces of 2014, perennial contributor Dyana Weissman offers this poetic prelude. Enjoy, and feel free to respond with your own. — SC Haikus and I go back a long time. Many of us learned about them in elementary school. I enjoyed them, particularly because of their traditional emphasis on nature. For that reason, it may seem odd to dedicate such a poem to a piece of software. But my philosophy has long been that the best typefaces are those that don’t rely on the computer for their design. Beautiful lines and shapes are…
  • Happy Birthday Mr. Typographica

    Indra Kupferschmid
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:44 am
    The staff has hijacked the blog — this one goes out to Stewf, our relentless purveyor of type news and commentary long and short. (Mostly short these days, so this post is also a reminder what a great platform this site still is. Let’s meet here more often again.) Thank you for everything. All the best to you. And many more happy years in type!
  • Questions for the New Design Observer

    Stephen Coles
    2 Jul 2014 | 5:36 am
    I was intrigued to see the tweet yesterday announcing a new Design Observer. The venue is widely recognized as an authoritative platform for graphic design criticism, but the design of the site itself always felt a bit out of touch with the modern web. This wasn’t helped by the impression — just mine? — that its founders represent in some ways the “establishment class” of design. Whether or not that judgment is valid, the founders have a long, proven record of solid work. And much of their Design Observer writing was good. Which is why, stylistic…
  • Size-specific Adjustments to Type Designs

    Stephen Coles
    28 Jun 2014 | 9:17 am
    For decades now, typography has lacked a vital component. Yet most of us had no idea what was missing. Soon after type made the jump from metal and wood to film and digital, it became size agnostic. Users gained the ability to scale a font for any setting, but lost the type maker’s size-specific optimizations. This newfound freedom altered the typeface’s intended appearance and, in many cases, its integrity. Fonts made for small text looked clunky and inelegant when enlarged. Fonts made for headlines became anemic and unreadable when reduced for body. With minor exceptions, typography…
  • A San Francisco Type Design Workshop with Sumner Stone

    Stephen Coles
    13 May 2014 | 12:26 pm
    Advanced educational opportunities for typeface design have spread swiftly over the last decade. In January, Troy Leinster’s overview of these new options covered his experience at Type@Cooper and KABK, and concluded with a list of eight other schools that offer specialized type design programs. Despite this welcome growth, ever since The Cooper Union launched its (now perennially successful) series in New York it has become painfully apparent to me and fellow enthusiasts who live nearby that a true post-graduate program in type design is still missing on North America’s West Coast. There…
 
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    Design is Kinky

  • Jess Marlow Wounded

    AJ
    3 Mar 2015 | 1:56 pm
    Talented Australian documentary photographer, Jesse Marlow, has a show opening in Melbourne at Lamington Drive next week. The opening is 11 May 6-9pm.
  • Oliver Barrett

    AJ
    3 Mar 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Illustration work by Cleveland, Ohio based Oliver Barrett.
  • Anonymous

    AJ
    3 Mar 2015 | 1:49 pm
    Anonymous, a studio based in Singapore, produce beautiful design work.
  • Sebastian Weiss

    AJ
    2 Mar 2015 | 1:40 pm
    Hamburg based architecture photographer Sebastian Weiss.
  • Sawdust

    AJ
    2 Mar 2015 | 1:29 pm
    London based creative agency Sawdust, a partnership between Rob Gonzalez and Jonathan Quainton, produce stylish typography and branding.
 
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    Jean François Porchez

  • Launching Type@Paris typedesign program

    Jean François Porchez
    25 Feb 2015 | 3:36 am
    In Europe, there is not much of type design related workshops. We have great longterm high level type design masters for a full year, or calligraphy evening classes, not so much alternatives as the Type@Cooper Condensed program. It’s why last summer, we came to the conclusion that can be a good idea to launch it in Paris…
  • ECV New York 2015

    Jean François Porchez
    2 Feb 2015 | 12:10 am
    For the third time, following very succesful trips in 2013 and 2015 we will be back to New York between the 10 to 15 February 2015 with a group of 11 french students! ECV Paris rent the TDC for few days to host the ECV masterclasses, along various visits.
  • ECV 2014 students typefaces

    Jean François Porchez
    28 Jan 2015 | 11:14 am
    During the winter 2014, our students from the ECV Typographic design have to work on a revival of typeface. This project was just a part of a more wider Typographic design course. They really discovered through this project how to draw letterforms, something they never tried in the past.
  • Conférences publiques du master design typographique en 2015

    Jean François Porchez
    25 Jan 2015 | 9:10 am
    Dans le cadre du master Design Typographique de l’ECV France, nous ouvrons au public les conférences et interventions généralement réservées à nos étudiants. Les thèmes sont variés, mais toujours en lien avec la typographie et le graphisme. L’entrée est libre, mais il faut s’inscrire en ligne.
  • ECV 2014 students presentations

    Jean François Porchez
    16 Dec 2014 | 12:08 am
    Recent projects from the third class of #ecvmdt2015 (master in typographic design started in early 2012). Our topics cover typography in many area as possible: identity, editorial project, signage, events identity. In addition we teach them lettering, and typeface design. We invite also several professional to present they work and share experiences. In next February 2015, we will comeback to New York for visits and masterclasses at the TDC.
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    Gary Hustwit

  • eBook and Kindle Out Now

    Gary Hustwit
    18 Feb 2015 | 7:32 am
    We’re pleased to announce that the ePub and Kindle versions of Helvetica / Objectified / Urbanized: The Complete Interviews are now available from Versions Publishing. For those of you who don’t want to lug around 2 1/2 pounds of paper, or if you want to search the text of the book, this is for you! You can purchase the eBook from Versions’ website, from iTunes, or at Amazon.com. The post eBook and Kindle Out Now appeared first on Gary Hustwit.
  • The Book is Finished!

    Gary Hustwit
    3 Feb 2015 | 12:32 pm
    Greetings friends! I can finally say those four little words I’ve wanted to say for the past year: the book is done! The Design Trilogy complete interviews book is a reality. I am blown away by how well it turned out, and how heavy it is: two and a half pounds! We just got the first copy overnighted to us, I’ve included a few photos below. Our friends at Build added some really nice touches to the design, like the neon yellow endpapers and a bonus gift of a custom bookmark. Beautiful. The books are en route to us from the printer now and they’ll arrive late this week. Order…
  • The Printing is Done!

    Gary Hustwit
    22 Jan 2015 | 7:21 am
    Greetings friends, just a quick update that the Design Trilogy Interviews book has been printed and is now being bound. Our printer sent along a few phone pix of the process. That’s a lot of paper! So now the binding happens, and the finished books will be on a truck to us from the printer next week. If you’ve pre-ordered the book, we’ll be emailing you once it ships. The ebook is coming along nicely as well, and it’ll be released at the same time we’re shipping the paper books. Thanks again everyone, I’m excited that it’s almost here. Cheers! - Gary…
  • Interviews Book Update

    Gary Hustwit
    29 Nov 2014 | 10:44 am
    Hello friends, hope you’re all well. So we were hoping to go to press with the book earlier this month, but we’re still putting the finishing touches on it. One issue is the length of the book: it’s gotten longer… much longer. I’d originally estimated it would be approximately 400 to 500 pages long. Well, it’s actually going to be closer to 700 pages! We’ve experimented with font size and other ways to be more economical with page space, but there’s no getting around the fact that there’s a tremendous amount of information in it. And while…
  • Alejandro Aravena TED Talk

    Gary Hustwit
    26 Nov 2014 | 7:29 am
    Urbanized star Alejandro Aravena of Elemental has a new TED Talk up, in which he discusses his continued activities in social housing and participatory design. The post Alejandro Aravena TED Talk appeared first on Gary Hustwit.
 
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    MarkSimonson.com Notebook

  • Proxima Nova 2.008

    mark@ms-studio.com
    25 Feb 2015 | 1:15 pm
    Proxima Nova version 2.008 is a major update. I’m in the process of getting it out to my distributors and it should be available from all of them within a couple of weeks. Here is a list of distributors that are currently offering the new version: MyFonts Fontspring I will update this list as each distributor is able to make the new version available. If your favorite font shop is not listed yet, please don’t bug them. It takes time for me to get the new data out to each of them (I have more than a dozen distributors) and it takes time for them to update their systems. New styles…
  • Adventures in Roller Calligraphy

    mark@ms-studio.com
    25 Aug 2014 | 3:06 pm
    Most of the calligraphy I’ve done was way back in college when I was studying graphic design, and very little since then. I’m just not that into it, which may seem strange coming from a type designer, but to me they are completely different things. Being good at one doesn’t necessarily make you good at the other; sometimes quite the opposite, I think. In spring of 2013, I went on a tour through Europe with about a dozen other type and printing geeks called Travels In Typography. When we visited Mainz, Germany, home of Johannes Gutenberg, father of movable type, we had the…
  • Coquette

    mark@ms-studio.com
    11 Dec 2013 | 1:18 pm
    As a type designer, it’s hard to anticipate how the fonts you make will be used. When I designed Coquette, I had only vague use scenarios in mind. I was thinking about traditional French scripts and Art Deco sensibilities primarily in terms of formal qualities. Coquette is not a connecting script, but it has many characteristics of connecting scripts. One of these details is the little blob on the inside of the lowercase “o”. It is an extreme simplification of a looping stroke that leads to the next character. To me, things like this are purely formal when I’m making…
  • The Quagmire of Print-Think

    mark@ms-studio.com
    30 Aug 2013 | 7:42 pm
    In the late seventies, personal computers were starting to emerge and generate interest among some people. I was mildly interested, but I had no idea what I would do with one. Suggested uses were things like: storing recipes, an electronic address book, or maybe play computer games like Star Trek. Mostly it seemed to be about writing programs in BASIC to, say, store recipes. Anyway, none of this really got me excited enough about computers to actually buy one. All that changed when I came across a copy of a book by Ted Nelson called Computer Lib / Dream Machines. He wrote the first…
  • Renaissance Anomaly

    mark@ms-studio.com
    30 May 2013 | 7:55 pm
    Reader Ivan Filipov sent me this curiosity from the FOX/Starz tv show Da Vinci’s Demons. I haven’t seen the show, but this is definitely a typographic anachronism. First of all, the typeface Gotham (released in 2002) has no place in Renaissance Italy. Gotham is based on mid-twentieth century American vernacular styles. In the Renaissance, the prevailing style, if it were painted on a wall, would have been something more along the lines of the versal hand (for example, something resembling Goudy Lombardic). That said, the idea that a large painted sign would appear…
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    Ralf Herrmann: Wayfinding & Typography

  • Bye bye opentype.info, hello Typography.Guru

    Ralf Herrmann
    10 Feb 2015 | 1:17 am
    Dear readers of my blog, I have started to phase out opentype.info. All articles which I considered worth saving were moved over to my new site Typography.Guru. All other articles are still available here for some months until I shut down the blog completely. Thanks for your interest and all the discussions on this blog. […]
  • Walbaum—the Man and the Typeface

    Ralf Herrmann
    8 Dec 2014 | 1:00 pm
    I put together a video explaining the development of the Walbaum Antiqua typeface and the style of the modern typefaces. Make sure to turn on HD to see the type specimen images in full resolution. Tweet
  • The Pronunciation of European Typefaces (Extended YouTube version)

    Ralf Herrmann
    29 Sep 2014 | 12:24 am
    Last year I posted a couple of MP3 files with the pronunciation of European typeface namens which are either German, French or Italien. I extended this selection and put it together as a YouTube video with type specimen images for each of the now 37 typefaces. Enjoy! Tweet
  • Historic “ASCII art” made with a Monotype machine

    Ralf Herrmann
    4 Sep 2014 | 8:47 am
    We all know ASCII art – the creation of computer images with a limited set of Latin letters. But this film from 1939 shows that even Monotype machines where used to create such pictures. Enjoy! Tweet
  • Capital Sharp S designs. The good, the bad and the ugly.

    Ralf Herrmann
    18 Nov 2013 | 4:40 am
    Two years ago I wrote an article with suggestions on how to design a Capital Sharp S (ẞ). Now that over 400 new type families with support for this new character have been released, I thought it would be a good time to review, how the typedesigners have drawn their Capital Sharp S. At first, […]
 
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    Fonts.com: About Fonts

  • Affiliate Program FAQs

    27 Feb 2015 | 12:24 pm
    The Fonts.com Affiliate Program is a smart and easy way to increase the profitability of your Web site while affiliating yourself with a respected leader in typography. Simply send people to Fonts.com and earn a 15% referral bonus for every purchase
  • eBook Font Solutions

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:49 am
    The Monotype Imaging eBook Font License provides the necessary licensing rights to embed fonts into eBook products for commercial distribution
  • Monotype Software and Services Agreement (Subscription)

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:46 am
    We recommend that you print this Web Font Software License Agreement for further reference. This Monotype Imaging Inc. Web Font Software License Agreement (the “Agreement”) becomes a binding contract between you and Monotype Imaging Inc. when you click on the area marked “ACCEPT LICENSE AGREEMENT” or similar language. If you do not wish to be bound by the Agreement, you cannot access or Use the Web Font Software. Please read this entire Agreement before you agree to be bound by its terms and conditions.
  • Monotype Imaging EULA

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:39 am
    This Monotype Imaging End User Agreement (the “Agreement”) becomes a binding contract between you and Monotype Imaging Inc. (a) when you click on the area marked “ACCEPT LICENSE AGREEMENT”, or, (b) if you are acquiring Font Software on a floppy disk,
  • Font Software for Electronic Publications End User License Agreement

    26 Feb 2015 | 7:39 am
 
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    You Should Like Type Too

  • Misc Mumbai (Handpainted) Signs Vol. 1

    Rob
    1 Mar 2015 | 10:30 pm
    This site has been moderately broken since the last update a couple months ago, but I’m happy to report that it’s now back to most of it’s pervious functionality. To celebrate, this post highlights some of my snapshots from the end of 2014 here in Mumbai.
  • We all know that F. W. Goudy did some…

    Rob
    9 Feb 2015 | 5:10 am
    We all know that F. W. Goudy did some weird stuff, but how did this make it all the way through (and into print)?
  • Web design is ?% typography.

    Rob
    10 Nov 2014 | 9:26 am
    The above image is of Bram Stein speaking at #wbfntdy on Nov. 8th. The photo is via: @typographische The below image is of Aurélien Foutoyet speaking at #ecvmdt2015 on Nov. 10th. Photo via: @typofonderie It’s difficult to see here, but behind Aurélien’s head says “stein”, so I believe he is quoting Oliver Reichenstein from this post. There is a big difference between 18.6% and 95%… Who is right, or closer? [update] Thanks to @kupfers who points out that Bram’s statistic was saying 18.6% of CSS code deals with typography, and it was a playful reference…
  • Faenza’s Giant Cemetery

    Rob
    10 Nov 2014 | 12:09 am
    Here are a few of my wonderful finds from Il Cimitero Dell’Osservanza in Faenza, Italy. This beautiful and sprawling cemetery takes hours to properly walk through, it is full of countless inspiring inscriptions, and it’s absolutely worth a visit. Maybe the Kerning conference will organize a tour of the grounds one of these years.
  • Harvard Book Store

    Rob
    4 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    I was amused by this selection of paperback book covers found in the basement at the Harvard Book Store in Cambridge.
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    The FontGear Blog

  • Typeface Tuesday: Obsidian

    fontgear
    3 Mar 2015 | 10:35 am
    Designed by Jonathan Hoefler and Andy Clymer. Obsidian was inspired by the decorative typefaces of the Industrial Revolution. To read more about the process of creating Obsidian, click here.
  • A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design

    fontgear
    21 Feb 2015 | 11:10 am
    You may have heard of Chip Kidd. He is an award winning graphic designer -best known for his book covers, or possibly his witty Ted Talks. But you may not know that he has recently written a book aimed at kids 10 and up titled GO: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design. You can read more about it here. Or watch the book trailer below.
  • Free Font: Retro Sans

    fontgear
    11 Feb 2015 | 6:19 am
    You can download Retro Sans here.
  • FontDoctor 10 for Macintosh now available

    fontgear
    4 Feb 2015 | 10:27 am
    February 4, 2015 CHARLOTTE, NC – FontGear Inc. (www.FontGear.com) announced today the release of FontDoctor 10 for Macintosh. FontDoctor is a professional software tool that locates and eliminates hard-to-find font problems that wreak havoc on Macintosh system performance and applications. FontDoctor has long been the industry standard for font problem diagnosis and repair for publishing and design professionals. FontDoctor will scan your fonts to locate and repair common font illnesses, including missing Postscript fonts, missing bitmaps, corrupt and damaged fonts, font conflicts, and…
  • Portrait of a Letterpress Printer

    fontgear
    22 Jan 2015 | 2:16 pm
    A short documentary about William Amer. A letterpress printer & instructor based out of Australia.
 
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    I Love Typography

  • Climbing Everest

    johno
    22 Feb 2015 | 1:53 am
    “Designing Zapfino Arabic takes everything I ever learned about type design and then some… Have never, ever, worked on anything this challenging.” — Facebook status: Oct. 24, 2013 Designing an Arabic companion to the Zapfino typeface was a running joke with my Monotype colleagues, one that I would react to half in amusement and half […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Climbing Everest
  • Notes on the first Books Printed in Italy

    johno
    13 Feb 2015 | 9:29 am
    In my recent article on The First Book Printed in Italy, I introduce the first books printed by Sweynheym and Pannartz in the Subiaco monastery complex in the Sabine hills to the west of Rome from 1465. On Twitter, in a great deal more than 140 characters, I received this enthusiastic barrage of Tweets: I […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Notes on the first Books Printed in Italy
  • This Month in Typography

    Alec Julien
    4 Feb 2015 | 5:19 am
    Welcome to this month’s roundup of type-related info and entertainment. Today, we make Helvetica cookies, tumble for ligatures, uncover a longstanding typesetting mistake by the New York Times, ponder typefaces for cities, get reacquainted with ASCII art, prognosticate about responsive fonts of the future, get to know font designer Carlos Fabián Camargo Guerrero, talk about […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. This Month in Typography
  • Murder in Italic

    johno
    26 Jan 2015 | 9:58 am
    Most will be familiar with the name Francesco Griffo, born in Bologna in 1450, and forever associated with the Venetian printer-publisher Aldus Manutius for whom he designed and cut roman, Greek, and the first italic fonts. Their partnership was an especially fruitful one and their collaboration at the end of the fifteenth and beginning of […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Murder in Italic
  • Making Fonts: GT Sectra

    johno
    13 Jan 2015 | 1:00 am
    GT Sectra is a serif typeface combining the calligraphic influence of the broad nib pen with the sharpness of the scalpel. This sharpness defines its contemporary look. The GT Sectra subfamily was originally designed for the long-form magazine Reportagen, a publication with interesting stories from all around the world. The Zürich-based studio Moiré designed the […] Sponsored by Hoefler & Co. Making Fonts: GT Sectra
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    TypeEd: Fundamentals of Typography » Rag Right

  • Stop Exhausting Your Reader

    Michael Stinson
    15 Feb 2015 | 5:09 pm
    We want to read what you have to say, but long lines of copy are laborious to read. And when readers have to put in too much effort, they will move on to something else, well, at least I do. How can we design a more comfortable reading experience?
  • Intimate, Curvaceous and Expressive

    Leah Faust
    24 Jan 2015 | 11:49 pm
    When creating a script mark for a brand, it is important to consider the tone of the name, style of concept, physical places it will exist: either designing for functionality and aesthetic.
  • Why Type Matters In Design And Life

    Michael Stinson
    5 Dec 2014 | 12:42 pm
    To master anything in life, one has to master the fundamentals. Once we master the skills, then we can truly learn how to find our own style—performing the fundamentals becomes second nature. We have to know the rules in order to break them, and its same in typography. We are just continuing a long, consistent history of typographic process that evolved to respond to how humans read.
  • Casting Type in The Role of Graphic Design

    Michael Stinson
    19 Nov 2014 | 9:13 pm
    How do you choose a typeface? Do you browse through fonts online and make educated guesses? Typefaces hold history, personality and unique details in their characters, to which you, as design have to "cast type" in the role of your storytelling design, being the "movie."
  • Quiosco: Quirky And Lovable

    Michael Stinson
    14 Nov 2014 | 12:12 am
    Type designer Cyrus Highsmith designed Quiosco to withstand the rigors of printing on cheap paper with high-speed web presses. This transitional serif was constructed specifically for readability at small sizes, revealed by its narrow character spacing and contrasting character outline with the counter shape.
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    Typewolf Blog

  • Typography Teardown of Advertising Age

    Jeremiah Shoaf
    23 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    I’m a huge fan of Samuel Hulick’s user onboarding teardowns so I thought it would be fun to try a new feature on Typewolf where I do a “typography teardown” of a popular website. I’ll review the design from a typographic perspective and discuss what makes the type work and what could potentially have been done better. In this first edition I’m going to take a deep dive into the type behind the Advertising Age website. But first, a disclaimer. Disclaimer: The following site was created by designers way more talented than myself. This is simply my opinion on…
  • The Best Type-Driven Websites of January

    Jeremiah Shoaf
    4 Feb 2015 | 9:00 pm
    This is the 12th installment of my monthly feature on Typewolf where I share my favorite type-driven websites from the previous month and then write a little about the typographic details behind the designs. You can check out last month’s post for December here. Kim Bost This is a simple site that uses a single typeface at a single size and weight. I think the key to making this work is the use of color — the white type adds much-needed contrast and the variation in the link underline color adds a warmth to the design. The poster style of Darby Sans, with its high contrast,…
  • My Favorite Sites With Nice Typography From 2014

    Jeremiah Shoaf
    21 Jan 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Every day on Typewolf I feature a site with nice typography. Out of the 365 sites featured over the course of 2014, these are my top 40 personal favorites. I was originally planning on doing a top 10 list, but after attempting to narrow down my favorites I realized there were just too many sites with beautiful type for me to choose just 10 or even just 20. So yes, 40 is a lot but I think every single one of these sites has something for type connoisseurs to appreciate. Ok, get ready to scroll because this is a long post… 40) Snask I remember the previous design of Snask was one of the…
  • The Ten Most Popular Web Fonts of 2014

    Jeremiah Shoaf
    12 Jan 2015 | 9:00 pm
    Welcome to the second annual edition of the ten most popular web fonts of the year as featured on Typewolf. For 2014, I have a full year’s worth of data with 365 sites being featured on the site. Last year’s list for 2013 was a little more curated and less backed by data as Typewolf hadn’t been around for a full year at that point. This list features typefaces from all type foundries regardless of where the typefaces can be purchased or licensed, unlike other lists that might only include fonts available on certain sites such as MyFonts or Typekit. It’s still a curated…
  • The Best Type-Driven Websites of December

    Jeremiah Shoaf
    31 Dec 2014 | 9:00 pm
    This is the 11th installment of my monthly feature on Typewolf where I share my favorite type-driven websites from the previous month and then write a little about the typographic details behind the designs. You can check out last month’s post for November here. Snask I remember the previous design of Snask was one of the first places I saw Apercu being used on the web. The folks at Snask are real trendsetters as this typeface has exploded in popularity over the last year or two. Their new redesign sticks with Apercu but adds in Platform, a geometric sans from Commercial Type. The bold…
 
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